How We are Preventing Bacterial Infections

Posted in Stomach Pain on 07/26/2021 06:10 AM

Understanding what disease really is

I am finding, in our offices and in daily conversation, more and more that people don't have a firm grasp on what illness and disease really is. This is not anyone person's fault. The public's understanding is subject to what they are told by the 'authorities' of any field. So what are the 'authorities' on health defining disease? I hear plenty of different points of view on this question. Let's narrow things down to one type of disease for now.


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Bacterial Infection

Ear infections, Staph infections, Strep throat, Pneumonia, etc. These are some of the diseases a microbiologist would think of when they think in terms of bacteria. Ok, we have certain types of bacteria, which cause certain types of infections and have certain symptoms. Let's look at Staph infections for a moment. Staphylococcus aureus is the species responsible here. What is commonly referred to as a 'staph infection' is a large boil in the skin tissue.


So, when skin gets exposed to this bacteria it leads to a boil...... Right? Wrong! Staphylococcus aureus is always on your skin. In fact, that is the home of this bacteria. It thrives in places like your armpits, moist creases, and between your toes. Yeah, it's responsible for those stinky feet smell. No one is without this bacteria.


However, most of us are not suffering from boils. Right? So, how does the infection start? Well, the bacteria need to find a break in the skin barrier so they can multiply underneath. I don't know about you, but, I've been cut plenty of times, accidentally poked myself with sharp things, and even punctured myself with a knife in a moment of clumsiness. How many of us experience a staph infection after that?  


For me, personally, never. What could be happening that keeps me from contracting this sort of infection? Why am I not getting boils on my face every time I cut myself shaving? What is it that is preventing bacterial infection? The answer is, I have an immune system. There are nerve fibers picking up information on every square millimeter of skin on my body which start an inflammatory reaction when I get any sort of irritation to the skin barrier. Immediately, this inflammation is slowing down the invading bacteria. This stops it from getting into the bloodstream and other areas of the body.


Then, little white blood cells flock to the area to put up a fight. They literally eat any sort of bacteria and keep the bacteria away from where they don't belong. Since Staphylococcus aureus is all over my body, my immune system recognizes it right off. It knows where it is and how to kill it. Natural Ear Infection Care In our office Ok, we know how we get the infections and that our body can stop them...


So, why do some people get a full infection and some don't? There must be something wrong with their immune system. What could go wrong? There could be a compromise in the immune system. The reason that you may have heard about MRSA(medication-resistant staph) is that it is a big deal in hospitals. 


People in the hospital who are recovering from surgery and that sort of thing are more prone to infection than others since their bodies are in a state of severe repair. There is just too much going on to deal with fighting off bacteria too. This leaves a higher rate of these types of infections within hospitalized populations than outside. Normal people out in the world are getting these infections too. Why? Here is the bottom line:


If your immune system isn't up to par, you are open to infection. If your nervous system cannot properly direct the immune system, you are at risk of infection. Here is how we are preventing bacterial infection in our office: our offices work to restore optimum function in the nervous system so that the body can provide organs, like the lymphatic system and the thymus, with all the information that they need.
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